Insulated Windows, YES!!

Vacuum Glass Windows

V-Glass vacuum Insulating Glass”Windows Insulating Glass ™– Pete Petit, Founder

“The typical home loses 30% of its heat through windows, so highly insulating windows are an energy efficiency option with a disproportionately large benefit.
Well-insulated walls deliver R-12 to R-20 insulation, 3 to 5 times less heat loss than triple glazed windows.
Why can’t windows be as warm as a wall?
A new Energy Star standard, which raised the window insulation hurdle to R-3.7, went into effect for the Northern region of the U.S. in 2016. One way the window industry meet it is to migrate to triple glazed windows, which are 50% thicker, 50% heavier, and 50% more expensive to make than current dual-pane argon-filled glazing.
The center pane is at risk of spontaneous cracking due to uneven heating in the hot sun.
Vacuum-insulated glazing has the potential to reduce heat loss in typical windows sold by around 60-70%.

This project will also improve the knowledge base to help other VIG performers.
Vacuum-insulated glazing units are made up of 2 panes of glass with a very small air space.
The air space contains spacers that help maintain the separation between the panes. The vacuum eliminates conduction and convection but not radiation, so a low-E coating is necessary on the pane of glass.
Conventional double glazing consists of two glass panes placed up to 20 mm apart, with the cavity between the panes filled with either dry air or an inert gas such as argon or krypton.

This gas reduces heat transfer through the glass due to its lower thermal conductivity.
The wider the gap between the panes, the lower the heat transfer, up to an optimum level above which circulation patterns in the gas reduce the benefit.
This means that the overall thickness of thermally-efficient double glazing is typically 24 mm.”

Vacuum Insulating Glass
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Pilkington Spatia Thermal Insulation

“Pilkington Spacia™ is the world’s first commercially available vacuum glazing.
It offers the thermal performance of conventional double glazing in the same thickness as single glass (6 mm).
Pilkington Spacia™ is different; the air between the two panes of glass is extracted, creating a vacuum.
Conventional double glazing consists of two glass panes placed up to 20 mm apart, with the cavity between the panes filled with either dry air or an inert gas such as argon or krypton.
This gas reduces heat transfer through the glass due to its lower thermal conductivity.

The wider the gap between the panes, the lower the heat transfer, up to an optimum level above which circulation patterns in the gas reduce the benefit.
It offers the same thermal performance as conventional double glazing in one quarter of the thickness and two-thirds of the weight.
A vacuum, even a small one, is much more effective at minimizing conduction and convection heat losses, so the gap between the two panes can be reduced to just 0.2 mm, giving an overall thickness of just over 6 mm.
Heat flow through radiation is limited through one of the glass panes having a low-emissivity coating, similar to that used in modern conventional double glazing.
Pilkington Spacia™ is also suitable for other applications where the use of thinner, low-weight glazing is desirable, for example in sliding box sashes, secondary glazing, or as one pane of a triple glazed “super-window”.
Click here to see the video on Pilkington Spacia™

Pilkington Spacia™

Vacuum glazing

“Conventional double glazing consists of two glass panes placed up to 20 mm apart, with the cavity between the panes filled with either dry air or an inert gas such as argon or krypton. This gas reduces heat transfer through the glass due to its lower thermal conductivity. The wider the gap between the panes, the lower the heat transfer, up to an optimum level above which circulation patterns in the gas reduce the benefit.
This means that the overall thickness of thermally-efficient double glazing is typically 24 mm.”

WHAT IS TRIPLE VACUUM INSULATED GLAZING?

Vacuum glass or more correctly, vacuum insulated glazing is an emerging technology aimed at meeting the severe thermal performance requirements of net-zero energy windows. A vacuum is created between two rigidly held panes of glass which maximizes thermal efficiency and sound insulation.
Triple vacuum insulated glazing (TVIG) has an ability to reduce thermal heat flow between the warm side and cold side of the window, i.e. to provide high thermal insulation or lower U value.
It is said to be smart because it is constructed with three sheets of 4 mm thick glass, with an evacuated cavity of less than 0.1 Pa, separated by 0.13 mm high and 0.3 mm diameter stainless-steel support pillars.
The edges are sealed with hermetic glass-alloy seal.
However, Dr. Saim Memon, a Senior Lecturer in Electrical Engineering at London South Bank University, says it’s one thing having a triple vacuum glazing technology and another thing to persuade the mass market to invest in this technology.
It is obvious that triple vacuum glazing is exposed to sunlight and thus must be designed to withstand different climates and temperatures to avoid degradation of the vacuum. Further research is required to investigate and improve the durability and duty cycle of the triple vacuum glazing with the use of non-evaporable getters, that absorb gases outgassed from the internal glass surfaces in the cavity provide long-term stability of vacuum pressure of TVIG, and cost-effective hermetic edge sealing materials.”

vacuum Science World

Gealan S 7000 IQ PROFILE SYSTEM

“The GEALAN corporate group is one of Europe’s leading manufacturers of vinyl profiles for windows and doors.
The core components of the GEALAN brand include modern profile systems such as the GEALAN-KUBUS® all-glass system, the S 9000 combined system and innovative products such as STV® static dry glazing, IKD® intensive core insulation, and acrylcolor colored window profiles.

The GEALAN
IKD®
Intensive core insulation